The M+G+R Foundation

Judeo Christian Liturgical Calendar

New and Traditional Listed Side by Side


Side Notes to the
2021 Calendar Comparative Document




The purpose of this document is to provide some details on which the calculations of the traditional liturgical dates - Christian and Jewish - are based.


New Calendar:
Inspired in the calendar Jesus used and His Manifestation in Time. Proposed and recommended as the New Judeo Christian Liturgical Calendar. (*)

Traditional Calendar:
Dates according to (a) Christian Catholic traditions or (b) modern Jewish traditions. Where it is not specified otherwise, "Traditional" refers to Traditional Roman Catholic. (**)



NOTES for January, February and March

Where it is not specified otherwise, "Traditional" refers to Traditional Roman Catholic.

Epiphany:
New: Always on January 6.
Traditional: January 6, but in some countries, like USA, the celebration is transferred to the Sunday between January 2 and January 8, inclusive. (Source1, Source2)

The Presentation of Our Lord Jesus Christ:
New and Traditional: 40th day after His birth. (Source)

The Baptism of the Lord:
New: Tuesday before Ash Wednesday in conformance with Scriptures [Matt. 3:16-17 and 4:1]
Traditional: The Sunday after January 6. (Source)

Ash Wednesday and Lent:
Ash Wednesday is exactly 46 days before Easter Sunday (40 days not counting the Sundays).
Traditional: Technically, under the Roman Catholic norms, the three days from Holy Friday to Holy Saturday (Eastern Triduum) are out of the liturgical season of Lent (Source).

Spring Equinox:
It is an astronomical date, not a feast. It does not depend on religious conventions.

Annunciation:
New and Traditional: Fixed date. Nine months before the celebration of the Nativity of Jesus Christ. (Source)

The Baptism of the Lord:
New: Tuesday before Ash Wednesday in conformance with Scriptures [Matt. 3:16-17 and 4:1]
Traditional: The Sunday after January 6. (Source)

Rosh Hashanah:
(Meaning "head of the year")
New: (Beginning of the year) Coincides with the beginning of the Essene year, which depends on the Spring Equinox (without involving the Moon).
Traditional (Orthodox Jewish): (Two-days celebration) Coincides with the beginning of the Jewish "civil" Year (around September), beginning on the seventh month of the Jewish "ecclesiastical" year. Yet, it is given some religious significance. The first day of the "civil" year is the first of this who-days celebration. (Source)



NOTES for April

Where it is not specified otherwise, "Traditional" refers to Traditional Roman Catholic.

Visitation of Mary to Elizabeth:

New: The seventh day after the Annunciation (fixed date). Always April 1st.
Traditional: Fixed date. Always May 31st.

Passover Meal and Easter Sunday:

As explained in The Real Timing of Jesus' Last Passover:

New Calendar: The date of the Passover Meal (always on Tuesday) is calculated first, then the Resurrection Sunday (commonly called Easter Sunday) is derived. The Last Supper was properly a Passover Meal (on Tuesday) according to the calendar followed by Jesus. The Tuesday of Passover depends on the count of a 14th day related to the beginning of the Spring (without involving the Moon).

Traditional (Orthodox Jewish): The Modern Jewish Orthodox Calendar is parallel to that followed by the Temple Masters of Jesus in His First Coming - a perverted calendar influenced by Babylonian customs (heavily dependent on the Moon cycles). In the year of His Crucifixion, the date for the Temple Masters to celebrate their Passover was the (Saturday) evening before the Resurrection Sunday.

Traditional (Roman Catholic): Without fully understanding that there were two dates for the Passover Meal - the one of Jesus and the one of the Temple Masters -, new Christians created a new perverted calendar by re-introducing the moon into the calculation of the Passover, wrongly suggesting that the date of the Easter Sunday was a Passover Meal date in the calendar followed by Jesus. According to this (now current) tradition, the date of the Easter/Resurrection Sunday is calculated first (depending on the first Full Moon in the Spring), then the Holy Thursday (when the "Last Supper" is traditionally celebrated) is derived.

Traditional (Orthodox Catholic): The same confusion is present as in the Roman Catholic calendar. Their calculation also depends on the Moon. In addition, their counting of days follows the Julian calendar instead of the Gregorian calendar (an offset of thirteen days).

Period of the Unleavened Bread:
New: (Four days) From the sundown on the Tuesday of the Passover Meal until sundown of Holy Saturday (Resurrection).
Traditional (Orthodox Jewish): (Seven days) From the sundown on the day of the Passover Meal up to seven days. (Source)

Yom Kippur:
(Meaning atonement and repentance)
New: From sundown on the Tuesday of the Passover Meal until 3 PM of Holy Friday, when Yeshua expires on the cross for the salvation of humanity.
Traditional (Orthodox Jewish): The tenth day of the seventh ecclesiastical Hebrew month (9 days after the first day of Rosh Hashanah). (Source)

Sukkot:
In this period the Exodus is memorialized.
New: (Seven days) From sundown of Holy Saturday (Resurrection) until the sundown of the following Saturday (the Saturday prior to Sunday of Divine Mercy).
Traditional (Orthodox Jewish): (Feast of Tabernacles) From the 15th day of the seventh month (around September) up to seven days. (Source)



NOTES for May and June

Where it is not specified otherwise, "Traditional" refers to Traditional Roman Catholic.

The Ascension of Our Lord Jesus Christ:

New: 40 days after Holy Saturday. Always Thursday.
Traditional: Generally 40 days after the Holy Saturday but some ecclesiastical provinces of USA transfer the date to the following Sunday. (Source1, Source2)

Christ the King:
New: The Sunday that follows Ascension Thursday and before Pentecost Sunday.
Traditional: The last Sunday of the Roman Catholic Liturgical Calendar, that is, seven days before Advent Sunday. (Source)

Pentecost Sunday:
New: 50 days after Holy Saturday. Shavuot is celebrated on the same day.
Traditional: 50 days after Holy Saturday. (Source)

Shavuot:
Delivery of the Ten Commandments by God to Moses.
New: Shavuot is combined with Pentecost Sunday in a single day.
Traditional (Jewish Orthodox): (Two-days festival) Begins on the 6th day on the third (ecclesiastical) Hebrew month. (Source)

Holy Trinity Sunday:
New: The Sunday following Pentecost Sunday.
Traditional: The Sunday following Pentecost Sunday. (Source)

Solemnity of the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ:
Commonly known as "Corpus Christi", but it is dedicated to the Most Holy Body and Blood of Jesus Christ.
New: The Sunday following Holy Trinity Sunday.
Traditional: The Thursday following Holy Trinity Sunday. In some places (like USA), it is transferred to the following Sunday. (Source)

Sacred Heart of Jesus:
New: The second Friday after Holy Trinity Sunday.
Traditional: The second Friday after Holy Trinity Sunday but in some places it is trasferred to the following Sunday. (Source)

Immaculate Heart of Mary:
New: The Saturday immediately following the celebration of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Never to be omitted.
Traditional: The Saturday immediately following the celebration of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Omitted when the date coincides with the Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul (as in the year 2019) or another Solemnity. (Source)



NOTES for the months May to December

Where it is not specified otherwise, "Traditional" refers to Traditional Roman Catholic.

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel:

New and Traditional: Fixed date. (Source)

Transfiguration of Our Lord Jesus Christ:
New and Traditional: Fixed date. (Source)

Assumption of Mary into Heaven:
New and Traditional: Fixed date. (Source)

Exaltation of the Cross:
New and Traditional: Fixed date. (Source)

Anniversary of the Miracle at Fatima:
New: Fixed date.
Traditional: Not celebrated according to the liturgical calendar. (Source1, Source2)

First Sunday of Advent:
The fourth Sunday before Christmas Day.
In 2020: Nov 29th.
In 2021: Nov 28th.
In 2022: Nov 27th.
In 2023: Dec 3rd.
If Christmas Day is Sunday, the date is Nov 2nd.  Monday >> Dec 3rd.  Tuesday >> Dec 2nd.  Wednesday >> Dec 1st.  Thursday >> Nov 30th.  Friday >> Nov 29th.  Saturday >> Nov 28th.  It is possible to compute the date of Advent Sunday by adding three days to the date of the last Thursday of November. (Source)

Immaculate Conception of Mary:
New and Traditional: Fixed date. (Source)

Christmas Day:
New and Traditional: Fixed date. The logical day to celebrate the Birth of the Messiah is December 25th.

Chanukah:
Celebrates the miraculously illuminated Menorah (seven-lamp lampstand) of the rededicated Jewish Temple for eight consecutive days [1 Maccabees 4:47-59 and 2 Maccabees 10:5-8].
New: Fixed date connected to the Birth of the Messiah.
Traditional (Jewish Orthodox): (Eight-days festival) The first day is on the 25th day of the ninth ecclesiastical Hebrew month (between late November and late December). (Source1, Source2)



GENERAL NOTES

(*) New Judeo Christian Liturgical Calendar inspired in the Calendar Jesus used and His Manifestation in Time:

[1] How are the dates determined

[2] Definition of Key Jewish Holy Days and why some are being incorporated into Christian Liturgical Celebrations by miguel de Portugal

[3] Theo-logic behind the New Liturgical Calendar


(**) Main sources consulted for Traditional Calendar:

- Calendar by USCCB and Spanish Liturgical Calendar, for the traditional Roman-Catholic dates

- calendardate.com for the traditional Jewish dates




Return to the Original Document



Published on February 4th, 2021

The Seal of St. Michael the Archangel © Copyright 2021 - 2024 by The M+G+R Foundation. All rights reserved. However, you may freely reproduce and distribute this document as long as: (1) Appropriate credit is given as to its source; (2) No changes are made in the text without prior written consent; and (3) No charge is made for it.


The M+G+R Foundation
Online since 1998
Introduction for First Visit Frequently Asked Questions
Home Page English Español Portugues
Search Page Index of Documents
Disclaimer About Us Contact
Back Up Home Page (Mirror Site)